James Baldwin and Me

I spent #BlackOutTuesday reading the texts of author James Baldwin from the film I am not your Negro.

I have been reflecting how my “slave rebellion” (using Baldwin’s words) will manifest. But his speech in 1974 at Berkeley — warning n***** warheads — had provided me with some direction.

I will no longer be an apologist.

Time to continue work on Black History but add history from within my own life time.

Credit to ourselves

Someone on The View asked the question, “What next?”  This was in regard to the action by many women at the Golden Globes last Sunday. This includes refusing to give into the “what are you wearing” talk (which, to be fair, was initiated by Joan Rivers years ago).

More importantly this included introducing us the public to the activists in women’s movements in other areas, such as Tarana Burke, Saru Jayaraman, Ai-Jen Poo and Marai Larasi and others. (come on, US Weekly, did you have to follow that story with click bait on 10 Best Beauty Looks on the Golden Globes? Really?)

So what next?  I think I already answered that question in my post about Lisa Nishimura.  We need to acknowledge the work of these women.  This is a slow trend but it is happening.

Clearly we as women know how to make the money to make films (Lisa Nishimura) and we know how to market films (that’s what Ava DuVernay was doing before Selma). And we know how to write books that get optioned, as Hidden Figures proved.  A book written by a Black woman made into a film starring Black women.  And guess what?  White men went to see it, too.

It can be done.

The next step?  We KNOW we have been oppressed but we have to stand by our work.  I don’t care about the designer dress you borrowed.  I want to know about your upcoming television and Netflix projects (Hollywood? Feh).

Because only you can best promote you.

 

 

 

Black Women in Alabama – 2017 in review

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#bwia with Doug Jones

2017 was a hard year for everyone:  ailing elderly parents, issues with our children and/or partners, problems in work or finding it, or coming down with sometimes  illness as serious as cancer (shoutout to B).

As I have repeated time and time again: #bwia #BlackwomeninAlabama. If they could move forward in adversity, anyone can.

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Monica Bodirsky, Kristine Maitland, Rev. Terrie Brookins, Rosemary Stehlik

But the only way we can get through it is to turn to our communities (often we have more than one).  I want to take this time, perhaps again, to thank friends, old (Bridge, SCA, BiWoT, WCC, et. al.) and new, for all the help they gave me during the crisis with my mother last May, among other things.

Also, thanks to my new friends, from Women’s Drumming Circle to the #broomwomen, for introducing me to a new way of looking at my life, from the participating in the arts to the moontimes.

2017 has been a time for me make decisions as to how I will move forward as I look up closer to fifty.  Things are looking good.

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Women’s Drumming Circle lead by Veronica Johnny.